Tree Care Answers

Valuable Tree Care Answers

We are happy to provide tree care answers below or call us to assess your particular situation.

Can I cut my tree in half?

When is the best time to prune my fruit trees?

How often should I water my trees?

How do I know if my tree is dying?

How should I prune my tree?

What type of tree can I plant in my property?

How should I trim a coconut palm?

What happens if I don’t trim my trees?

If my coconut palm is full of nuts, will it break?

What is “topping”?

Can I cut my tree in half?

Yes, you can cut it in half, it is not recommended though. That practice is called “topping” and is very detrimental to a tree’s health. if it does not have enough water and nutrients accumulated in its root system, it will certainly “die”.

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When is the best time to prune my fruit trees?

The best time to trim your fruit trees is right after they are done fruiting. If you prune them properly and do not take more than 25-30% off their canopy, the stress effects are minimized and more than likely they will produce the following year. Ornamental trees can be pruned anytime of the year in Hawai’i. “Ask an arborist.”

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How often should I water my trees?

If your trees are well established, they are mature and they have enough space for their root system, once or twice a year will suffice. Deeply water for about twelve hours all around the drip-line (the perimeter where the branches end) of the trees during the summer months with a garden hose slightly open with the water flowing at about two and a half gallons per minute. “Ask an arborist.”

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How do I know if my tree is dying?

If you suspect that your tree is declining, call an arborist. There are many external factors that you are not aware of which cause trees to decline such as: droughts, diseases, blights, absorption of toxic chemicals in the water, air pollution, acid rain, etc… “Ask an arborist.”

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How should I prune my tree?

Consult an arborist. lf the tree is too tall, you ought to reduce its height by “drop crotching”; if it is too thick, you ought to “thin it out”, “remove dead branches, suckers, and water sprouts”; if it is too wide, you ought to “reduce its crown”; if it is too low, you ought to “lift its canopy”; if it is too ugly or sick, you ought to consider replacing it with a younger and healthier tree. “Ask an arborist.”

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What type of tree can I plant in my property?

Consult an arborist or a landscape architect. A lot of factors come into play such as the micro-climate in the area, the watering system, the surrounding vegetation, the landscape theme, the growth pattern of the species, the available space, the type of soil and the purpose of the action “Ask an arborist.”

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How should I trim a coconut palm?

You ought to cut, preferably with a sharp knife the old-yellowish hanging branches following a forty five degree pattern or a fountain-like shape, removing all the nuts, flowers and seed pods and leaving a clean-shaved trunk.. The healthiest, strongest and most beautiful trees are the ones that nature trims. “Ask an arborist.”

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What happens if I don’t trim my trees?

Nothing. They trim themselves, look at nature! The purpose of trimming trees is for liability issues, beauty and aesthetics, improve production (in the case of fruit trees), and maintain a desired height. “Ask an arborist.”

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If my coconut palm is full of nuts, will it break?

Consult an arborist. If the palm is old and brittle, if it has been raised in an urban environment with root and space restrictions, if it has been trimmed most of its life, the answer is yes. It might break. Every palm has a “resistance load strength”, which is the strength developed throughout its life to support a load. If you take that load off (removing coconuts, fronds, flowers and seed-pods) every six months or every year, it will not develop a high “resistance load strength” making it vulnerable to breakage. “Ask an arborist.”

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What is “topping”?

Topping is a bad practice not recommended by true arborists. It consists of taking the top off a tree in order to reduce its height or size. Topping makes trees dangerous and look terrible. The reaction of the tree is to produce branches in a mass explosion of exponential growth in some instances reaching six feet of growth in a single season. Most of the new branches are poorly attached to the primary branch or main trunk, they become larger and heavier and tend to break in the wind.

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