NewsLetterPage

NewsLetter Page

Hire Certified Tree Arborists

Posted by on Mar 27, 2013 in Blooper of the Month, Kendall Landscape Newsletter | 0 comments

Next Time Hire Certified Tree Aroborists When you want to succeed with your plan next time hire certified tree arborists, so the story below won’t happen to you.

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New Equipment

Posted by on Mar 27, 2013 in Equipment of the Month, Kendall Landscape Newsletter | 0 comments

New Equipment

Another Piece of New Equipment Keeping productive, another piece of new equipment was needed at Kendall Landscaping. The SP7015 TRX from Carlton. This is a unique powerful tracked machine that features wireless remote control, 4 speed ground drive system, traction control and expanding tracks. Patented turntable system keeps the machines center of gravity low making this a very stable grinding platform. This stump grinder is unrivalled in specification and productivity coupled with low...

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Lobate Lac Scale

Posted by on Mar 27, 2013 in Kendall Landscape Newsletter, Pest of the Month | 0 comments

Lobate Lac Scale

The Dangers of Lobate Lac Scale The March Pest Warning is of The Dangers of Lobate Lac Scale.  Hawaii Department of Agriculture has specified specific processes for guarding against the spread of this pest. Here are a few suggestions.  Green waste from pruning  or situations of trees with Lobate Lac Scale being removed, it is best to leave the waste on site Chipped green waste from a pruned tree can be left as mulch around the tree that was pruned. Smaller green waste from types of hibiscus branches should placed in plastic bags that are dark, so when left in the sun the heat will help to kill the pest.  Exposing the green waste for a month or more in the sun should be sufficient as well. Main point is to keep the infected material close to where it was found so as not to spread to other parts of Oahu   So far research on Lobate Lac Scale has not been done extensively enough to have a clear indication of it’s life cycle.  These pointers are the best attempts at keep it in guard, though it is established itself well enough, it probably will not be eradicated....

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Buying the right Plant

Posted by on Mar 27, 2013 in Kendall Landscape Newsletter, Plant of the Month | 0 comments

Buying the right Plant

March Plant tip – Buying the right plant We know buying the right plant can be difficult. Are you tired of buying those beautiful bromeliads at the nursery or hardware store with the tall flower and then taking it home and finding it dead within a month. Try the Sheba! It is a smaller Bromeliad that is more sun and drought tolerant than most other Bromeliads though it does great in 50% shade too. They are variegated green and white with a red center. They do not quite have a tall flower like some of the rest, but not only will this plant live for the long term, it propagates very quickly and can create a great mid-range height ground cover in no time....

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Watering Tips

Posted by on Mar 27, 2013 in Kendall Landscape Newsletter, Tip of the Month | 0 comments

Watering Tips

Basic Watering Tips Here are a few basic watering tips to maximize your watering efficiency: The best time to water is at first light. Make sure all sprinklers are tight and not leaking water. Make sure to utilize your “Seasonal Adjust” option on your irrigation timer. Frequently observe system to ensure all components are working properly and to look for water runoff vs. absorption rate. Add mulch to planting beds, this reduces watering needs by keeping soil moist. Mulch will also increase microbiological agents in the soil resulting in loose aerated soil to allow water to more readily be absorbed into soil. The Most Common Mistake is over Watering   To check if you are over watering, you can conduct the all mighty finger test! The simplest test anyone can do. If you feel your plant is not doing well and concerned it is due to the amount of water provided, simply stick your finger in the soil. If it comes out muddy, then you know not to water it. If it comes out dry, then it is time to water. The Most Common Gardening Mistake It is the most common gardening mistake for people to think that if a plant is not doing well, or better yet for a plant to be healthier, is to water it more. Contrary to this belief home owners and landscape companies make, there are (4) major necessities:  sun oxygen water nutrients Over-watering induces weeds, increases soil compaction and soil runoff. A Balance Approach to Gardening It is simple, but important to find a balanced approach to gardening. Over-watering and under watering can both produce excessive weeds. Standing water induces nut grass that may or may have not been dormant for years in the soil. Many varieties of nut grass have become known to be the “most difficult weed to eradicate”. Once it begins to grow, it can and will take over large areas. Often times people do not notice it till it’s too late because it looks very similar to grass and by that time it has taken over. The Dangers of Over watering To  avoid the dangers of  over watering and irregular irrigation intervals it is important to understand the concaquences. It can create soil compaction. Standing water breaks up the soil into finer sediment while the organics rise to the top and eventually wash away. Soil compaction then restricts oxygen and nutrient absorption by the plant and ironically enough WATER! The cause of the problem in the first place. Excessive soil runoff can be simply be reduced by education and awareness of the issue. There are a couple of fancy terms to describe why the soil can easily be washed away; Evapotranspiration Rate and the less technical percolation or absorption rate. (If you would like to bore yourself further on these rates, please feel to look them up on the web.) In layman’s terms, water or irrigate the landscape enough to saturate the area though stop prior to visible runoff. This will let you know what the absorption rate of you soil is. Let the water absorb into the soil. Repeat process when you begin to see the least drought tolerant plant in your landscape begin to wilt. Repeat process and then once again slightly prior to wilting of that...

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