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Tree Planting Tips

Posted by on Jun 3, 2014 in Tip of the Month | 0 comments

Considerations before Tree Planting Before proceeding forward with tree planting on your property , there are a few things to consider. With these few steps take care of, you should be able to enjoy the added beauty to your property enjoyment of added shade potential harvest of luscious fruit and added value to your whole property. First Steps in Tree Planting Tree selection:  Each property has different soil and each home owner has a different desire and consideration as to what is expected for future beauty, enjoyment, and practicality. Tree Placement: Different properties and building structures will determine the proper location of use as well as functionality of each different tree type with surrounding vegetation and structures. Tree Planting Principles: No matter what the desire you might have in mind, if you do not follow proper tree planting techniques matched to the particular tree and the soil needs, then the over-all result will not be successful. Almost everyone has an understanding of the value of trees, but becoming educated before initial steps to plant selection and planting will make for a much better end result. Read the few steps here and follow the links we have provided and you will be ahead of the curve in having a successful addition to your trees and landscape...

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Tree Trimming Equipment

Posted by on May 28, 2014 in Equipment of the Month | 0 comments

Tree Trimming Equipment

Ditch Witch Tree Trimming equipment The usefulness of having the right tools like the Ditch Witch SK650 to do the job makes the over all project more efficient and a more orderly work-site. Having the right tools, the properly trained tree technicians and years of knowledge will make sure that we handle your job to your greatest satisfaction. Whether a crane is needed or any other special tool, it is dependent upon several factors in determining required machinery: The type and size of the trees involved The terrain that needs of the work area The closeness to other property, i.e. structure and utilities The safety of the crew and the tenants of the property. ....

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Little Fire Ant Infestations

Posted by on May 26, 2014 in Pest of the Month | 0 comments

Little Fire Ant Infestations

LFA The Little Fire Ant The little fire ants or(LFA) have become a problem all over neighborhoods of the Pacific. Though these petite passive ants from South America are seemingly harmless, for Hawaii they pose a credible threat. They can deliver a potent painful sting, cause blindness in animals they attack and throw off the balance of biodiversity.  Should LFA have a chance to increase their population in Hawaii, they could become the state’s worst parasite and the most destructive to the bio-system. All over the Pacific neighborhoods have been overwhelmed with this little creature.  If a solution is not mitigated to halt this little fire ants propagation, Hawaii could stand to lose much of our agricultural crops.  Not only crops, but peace of mind to enjoy our own gardens, yards, hiking and recreational areas would be under assault. Birds who nest in the ground, sea turtle hatchlings, pets, and even common pests, which are part of our eco-system would be under attack. Once these little fire ants are get a foothold, it is next to impossible to eradicate them. The spread of little fire ants takes place with the transport of plants, plant material, greewaste and refuse to news sites. Not only are these ants hazardous to pets, but infest fields and yards as well as move into houses and other buildings.  These tiny ants can cause a burning sting when they bite and may even cause welts and then develop into an intense itch lasting for more than a week. LFA can be seen in vegetation or on the ground. They will explore plants of all sizes in their search and fall off when the plants are brushed.  When picking fruit, pruning trees or picking flowers can bring LFA falling down in mass onto an unsuspecting person. Though new to Hawaii, the little fire ant is native to Central and South America and has spread not only to Hawaii, but throughout the Pacific. First being recognized in Hawaii in the late 90s at Puna’s Hawaiian Paradise Park. Though early attempts were made in halting the infestations, the ant has continued to spread from infestation in plants and nurseries. On Kauai, Maui and Big Island attempts have been made to control infestations. With limits on agency resources and lack of sufficient staff, control or eradicate these pests has been impossible. Public assistance in identifying and working with agencies to help eradicate them is essential. More information about fire ant eradication in Hawaii Click...

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Milo Tree

Posted by on May 23, 2014 in Plant of the Month | 0 comments

Milo Tree

MILO – Thespesia Populnea The Milo Tree is part of the Mallow genus or Malvaceae. It is comprised of eighteen species in the genus. Without getting too technical, it’s main characteristic is it’s durability to withstand the environment and the seed to withstand the salt of the sea in it’s ocean voyage throughout the Pacific Islands.   Though the name come from Greek thespesios or devine it is known by the generic name Thespesia referring to T. populnea, When Captain Cook was collecting plants in the Pacific this is one of his collected plants from Tahiti where is was considered sacred and was found around places of worship. The term populnea, poplar-like, was used in regards to its leaves similar to poplar trees.   Hawaiian Name: Milo The name references its twist, curl and spin of the trunk and limbs. This name is also used in the Marshall Islands and American Samoa The fruits and seeds are salt tolerant and are distributed island to island by sea. The seeds will germinate even after a year in seawater. This has made them  a prime candidate for proliferation among the islands of the Pacific. Used over the centuries with wide variety of function, from containers to implements.  It has stood the test of time.  Milo in History Though in the past the milo was used mostly by the ancient Hawai’i chiefs for their furnishings and jewelry. Surrounding the home of King Kamehameha were many milo trees. Though today it is less common than in ancient times, it is a great shade plant to have around houses close to the sunnier coast line. It thrives in loose soil and grows better on the lowlands than it does in the central island mountain forests. Early Polynesian settlers carried the seeds with them on their voyages. The Milo is a fast growing plant that was used in Tahiti around the temples, said to be spiritually important and involved with chants and prayers. Not only is this plant found in Polynesia dn Micronesia, but also in tropical Africa. Milo tree is part of the Hibiscus family and used for it’s bark fiber for cordage. The many uses of the milo tree from die, oils, medicine and gum from various parts of the plant made it a main stay of the culture for centuries. Used for poi bowls and calbashes, the milo tree was a daily used...

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Choose a Licensed Arborist

Posted by on May 23, 2014 in Tip of the Month | 0 comments

Choose a  Licensed Arborist

Why Choose a Licensed Arborist It may not seem easy to choose a license arborist. But, with a little research here you will understand a few points to cover if you wish to have a not only a great result in the moment, but protect the viability and health of your property and plants for the future. An arborist is a specialist and knowledgeable in a broad list of areas They are aware of specific needs of individual trees The proper placement and demands in regards to other plants in the area. Proper pruning for health and safety of the tree and surrounding property Certified arborists are trained and equipped to provide proper care and safety during maintain  trees, but as importantly during the normal growth and life of the tree. Hiring an arborist is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns. Well-cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. Poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability. Pruning or removing trees, especially large trees, can be dangerous work. Tree work should be done only by those trained and equipped to work safely in trees. A check off list of Questions Using a simple check off list to guide you through interviewing and selecting your certified arborist will help to guide you through what might seem a confusing task. But, these few questions will help you keep focused and on point. Check for membership in professional organization Check for Certification such as ISA Arborist certificate Ask for proof of insurance Check for proper permit and licensing Get more than one estimate Don’t always accept the lowest bid Be wary of individuals who go door to door with hard sell...

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Honolulu Tree Services

Posted by on Feb 26, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Tree Services With the year round weather of Hawaii Trees need servicing all year around. The best Honolulu Tree Services available is from Kendall Landscaping Services, Inc. A typical service at the Academy of Arts museum in Honolulu To all keep property healthy, regular scheduled tree trimming and occasional tree removal is an essential process of keeping a landscape in top shape.  To learn about proper maintenance or to schedule service, just call Andrew at (808) 220...

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Posted by on May 27, 2013 in Kendall Landscape Newsletter, Uncategorized | 0 comments

H awaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) has requested that the green waste generated from pruning or removing a Lobate Lac Scale (LLS) infested plant be left at the site where it originated to reduce the risk of spreading this pest around Oahu. For example, chipped green waste from a tree can be left as mulch under the tree that was pruned. Smaller green waste, like hibiscus branches, can be bagged in dark plastic and left in the sun in an out-of-the-way corner of the property for a few days. The heat generated in the bag will hopefully be sufficient to “cook” the LLS. Leaving any of the green waste out in the sun for a month or so would probably work as well. Unfortunately, research on the life cycle of LLS and how long the different stages last doesn’t exist, so this is just a best guess. It is certainly better than doing nothing. LLS is sufficiently established on Oahu to be impossible to eradicate, but landscape professionals are the first line of defense in slowing it...

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Posted by on May 11, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

        p.O. Box 25003- Honolulu, Hawaii 96828 – (808)220-3452, Office (808)254-9693 – office@kendalllandscapeservice.com  ...

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April Tip of the Month

Posted by on Apr 1, 2013 in Kendall Landscape Newsletter | 0 comments

T he majority of the population believes that when a plant or palm is not doing well to simply lay down some fertilizer. Is the area being over watered, under watered? Is the soil compact? Is it too acidic or alkaline? These are just a few of the questions one should look into prior to just laying down fertilizer. If the plant is being over watered, often times you may see the tips of the leaves brown out, not enough water leaves begin to wilt. Also, when the soil is heavily compacted fertilizing may be a temporary solution. However, the majority of the nutrients will just wash away because the soil is not able to absorb water which carries the fertilizer. The pH in your soil plays a big part to plant and tree health. Over fertilizing lowers pH overtime therefore it would be suggested to add lime. In areas such as Ewa Beach where it is hot with little rainfall, the soil is most likely alkaline. Therefore sulfur should be added to the soil. Mulch and compost also help tremendously to a high pH alkaline soil.The best and most prudent way to go is to test the pH of your soil with a pH tester that can be purchased at most any hardware store and adjust accordingly. Also, try to stay away from synthetic fertilizers unless there is a severe specific case. Composting, worm casting and laying mulch are all highly recommended to increase soil/nutrient absorption rates and microbiological activity in the soil. Cow, pig and/or chicken manure should also be added and mixed into the compost for better results. These remedies do not take place over night but are a steady step in the right...

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Hire Certified Tree Arborists

Posted by on Mar 27, 2013 in Blooper of the Month, Kendall Landscape Newsletter | 0 comments

Next Time Hire Certified Tree Aroborists When you want to succeed with your plan next time hire certified tree arborists, so the story below won’t happen to you.

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