Pest of the Month

Lobate Lac Scale

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Lobate Lac Scale

Lobate Lac Scale Pest   The pest of the month for July is the lobate lac scale insect which was discovered in 2012 during an arborist climbing competition. This unwanted pest of many Hawaiian pest has managed to infect at least 50 species of native and non-native Hawaii plants and is putting in danger some local banyans as you can see from the video below. An Odd Cousin the Lac As a little side history to the lac species of insect, certain genus of this insect are actually part of a products produced in India and Thailand. The resin from the excresion of the insect are used in confectioners glaze. “Pharmaceutical glaze is an alcohol-based solution of various types of food-grade shellac. The shellac is derived from the raw material sticklac, which is a resin scraped from the branches of trees left from when the small insect, Kerria lacca (also known as Laccifer lacca), creates a hard, waterproof cocoon. When used in food and confections, it is also known as confectioner’s glaze, resinous glaze, pure food glaze, natural glaze, or confectioner’s resin.” The Local Lac Scale In Hawaii we are not fortunate to have a pest which is an integral part of the local economy. The trees and other plants which give Hawaii its value as an Island of Beauty are being attacked by the pest. Though it is specifically on the Island of Oahu, it may be a matter of time before it spreads to other island without serious mitigation. A little more about our local pest and its definition.  “Paratachardina pseudolobata, the lobate lac scale, is a polyphagous and pestiferous lac scale insect, which damages trees and woody shrubs in Cuba, Florida, the Bahamas and the Australian territory of Christmas Island. It was mistakenly identified as Paratachardina lobata (Chamberlin), an insect native to India and Sri Lanka, but was in 2007 recognized and named as a distinct species based on material from Florida; its native distribution is as yet unknown. The new lac insect was described based on all stages of the female (adult, second-instar nymph and first-instar nymph), during the revision of the genus Paratachardina, wherein all its known species were redescribed.” To Report Suspected Infestations of the lobate lac scale, please call the numbers below: Call Us:808-220-3452  Oahu: 808-973-9525 Maui: 808-873-3949 Kauai:808-274-3072 Hawaii Island: Hilo: 808-974-4146 Kona:...

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Naio or Myoporum Thrips

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Myoporum Thrips Pest Naio Thrips also know as Myoporum Thrips was found in Waikoloa on the Big Island back in 2009. These sample have been assessed by University of Hawaii, Hawaii Department of Agriculture as well as California Dept. of Agriculture and US Department of Agriculture. The Hawaii common name is “naio thrips”, it is known in California as myoporum thrips. At Waikoloa location, the thrips was found to be the cause of servere galling at the terminals and also on young leaves.Adult naio thrips are found to be dark bronw to black and elongated insect with the young thrips being orange to yellow in color with the same shape just smaller. As far back as 2005 a speices thrip species were assessed as causing extensive damage to nursery and landscape stock. This Mypporum Thrips, while a new species name Klamborthrips. Unversities, State and Federal agricultural depts are constantly trying to assess the growing damage and migration of these different spieces across the nation and reduce damage and find solutions to the advancement of these pests.  Thrips Thrips (Order Thysanoptera) are tiny, slender insect s with fringed wings (thus the scientific name , from the Greek thysanos (fringe) + …   How to Kill Thrips Pests in Your Garden In this tutorial, we cover the typical garden pest known as “Thrips”. We’ll go over what to look out for and how to get rid of them! Click Links to Find Prod…   Bayer CropScience – Frankliniella occidentalis Over the past 25 years the Western flower thrips has spread from its origins in the south-western parts of the USA to become a major greenhouse pest. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tjkuh8e07NE&feature=youtube_gdata_player...

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Little Fire Ant Infestations

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Little Fire Ant Infestations

LFA The Little Fire Ant The little fire ants or(LFA) have become a problem all over neighborhoods of the Pacific. Though these petite passive ants from South America are seemingly harmless, for Hawaii they pose a credible threat. They can deliver a potent painful sting, cause blindness in animals they attack and throw off the balance of biodiversity.  Should LFA have a chance to increase their population in Hawaii, they could become the state’s worst parasite and the most destructive to the bio-system. All over the Pacific neighborhoods have been overwhelmed with this little creature.  If a solution is not mitigated to halt this little fire ants propagation, Hawaii could stand to lose much of our agricultural crops.  Not only crops, but peace of mind to enjoy our own gardens, yards, hiking and recreational areas would be under assault. Birds who nest in the ground, sea turtle hatchlings, pets, and even common pests, which are part of our eco-system would be under attack. Once these little fire ants are get a foothold, it is next to impossible to eradicate them. The spread of little fire ants takes place with the transport of plants, plant material, greewaste and refuse to news sites. Not only are these ants hazardous to pets, but infest fields and yards as well as move into houses and other buildings.  These tiny ants can cause a burning sting when they bite and may even cause welts and then develop into an intense itch lasting for more than a week. LFA can be seen in vegetation or on the ground. They will explore plants of all sizes in their search and fall off when the plants are brushed.  When picking fruit, pruning trees or picking flowers can bring LFA falling down in mass onto an unsuspecting person. Though new to Hawaii, the little fire ant is native to Central and South America and has spread not only to Hawaii, but throughout the Pacific. First being recognized in Hawaii in the late 90s at Puna’s Hawaiian Paradise Park. Though early attempts were made in halting the infestations, the ant has continued to spread from infestation in plants and nurseries. On Kauai, Maui and Big Island attempts have been made to control infestations. With limits on agency resources and lack of sufficient staff, control or eradicate these pests has been impossible. Public assistance in identifying and working with agencies to help eradicate them is essential. More information about fire ant eradication in Hawaii Click...

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Lobate Lac Scale

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Lobate Lac Scale

The Dangers of Lobate Lac Scale The March Pest Warning is of The Dangers of Lobate Lac Scale.  Hawaii Department of Agriculture has specified specific processes for guarding against the spread of this pest. Here are a few suggestions.  Green waste from pruning  or situations of trees with Lobate Lac Scale being removed, it is best to leave the waste on site Chipped green waste from a pruned tree can be left as mulch around the tree that was pruned. Smaller green waste from types of hibiscus branches should placed in plastic bags that are dark, so when left in the sun the heat will help to kill the pest.  Exposing the green waste for a month or more in the sun should be sufficient as well. Main point is to keep the infected material close to where it was found so as not to spread to other parts of Oahu   So far research on Lobate Lac Scale has not been done extensively enough to have a clear indication of it’s life cycle.  These pointers are the best attempts at keep it in guard, though it is established itself well enough, it probably will not be eradicated....

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